Set forth below is the text of a comment that I recently posted to the discussion thread for another blog entry at this site: The comment was present tense. You immediately shifted to past tense. The question was why are you doing nothing NOW? Your answer: “I have never done one smidgen less than all that I can do.” So right now, nothing is absolutely all you can do. You’re as helpless as a newborn babe in the snow. You may not have noticed, but newborn babes in the snow generally aren’t rich and famous. And they have the excuse of being newborn. What’s your excuse for your helplessness? We live in communities. The community in which I live has not offered the amount of help that I need to bring down Buy-and-Hold and replace it with Valuation-Informed Indexing. That’s my explanation for why I am not rich and famous today, for why I am instead a newborn babe in the snow. Say that you were one of the women who was attacked by Bill Cosby. And say that you tried to do something about it when it happened. And that no one cared. He just kept committing his crimes because no one cared enough to take effective action. The world would be telling you that you were helpless, right? That’s the message that the world has been sending me for 16 years. Now — If the world sends you a message that you are helpless, should you give up on your efforts to do good? In some circumstances, you should. If a woman who was attacked by Bill Cosby in 1965 made efforts to seek justice and received no help, I certainly wouldn’t have blamed her if she stopped making those efforts. And I wouldn’t blame someone who has made efforts to tell the world how stock investing really works if they ran into the sort of resistance that I have run into. We are all given only so many years of life and we have to make judgments as to how to employ those years of life energy. There’s a case for me saying after 16 years:”Oh, I gave this a good shot and it hasn’t yet paid off, I think I will direct my energies elsewhere.” But there is also a good case — I think a much better case — for me soldiering on. Bill Cosby […]

Je suis d’accord avec toi que ce type de société semble devenir de plus en plus populaire. Il y a peu de temps, j’ai vu sur leur compte Twitter que Justin Trudeau était même venu visiter leurs bureaux. Par contre, quand j’ai parlé de Wealthsimple à ma banque (je suis chez Desjardins), il m’ont dit qu’il n’avait jamais entendu parler de cette compagnie… (si c’est vrai, je m’inquiète un peu pour eux car il me semble qu’une banque se doit de connaître un minimum la concurrence).

Most people invest their hard-earned money in the stock market through mutual funds or ETFs. Often this is through a company-sponsored plan such as a 401(k). Watching the daily swings in the value of your holdings can seem quite mysterious. If you own a stock and research what the business does, you will start to understand the relationship between business performance and the value of your stock holding. In the short-term, a variety of crazy factors can push the price of your company’s stock around. But in the long-term, the price of your company (and stock) will be determined by its business performance. And it’s the long term-that matters. As you get to understand how this works for one company, you will begin to get a feel for how the markets behave, although I don’t know that anyone truly understands the gyrations of the stock markets.


Though the Trump administration has looked to tariffs to help balance out a huge trade deficit with China, these added costs on aluminum, steel, and potentially other Chinese goods, could come back to haunt businesses and U.S. consumers. As material costs rise as a result of tariffs, businesses have little choice but to pass along these higher costs to consumers. That will likely result in less consumption, and an eventual pullback in spending from businesses, which may lead to a borderline recession.
These blogs also often lead to additional resources you can use to further your education. Generally, they mention other bloggers or books they’ve read to help them on their investing journey. This a method that Robert Farrington, investor and founder of TheCollegeInvestor.com recommends to his readers. "I highly suggest reading blogs and websites geared towards beginning investors," Farrington says. "There are a lot of amazing free resources out there for individuals looking to learn how to invest. For example, we have our free Learn How To Invest video training course, that goes through the basics of how to get started investing."
Welcome to the July 2012 Carnival of Passive Investing, a monthly collection of the best and most intelligent Passive Investing strategy articles around the internet. Some people foolishly want to beat the market (want being the key word) but we just want to invest with it. The purpose of the carnival is two-fold: To provide a forum to showcase articles and research in passive investing strategies (i.e. investing in ETFs, index mutual funds, etc. in such a way that one avoids…
A light-hearted look back on the six key lessons that investors can learn from studying stock market history. There are better times to invest in equities than others, but - crucially - we only know whether now is a good time or not with the benefit of hindsight. The good news is that, even if you invest just as markets are about to tumble - as they did in 1929, for example - you will be rewarded if you hold tight and resist the temptation to keep tinkering with your portfolio.

The P/E ratio of the S&P-500 is over 25, something that has only happened three times in history, once during the 1890s, once somewhat before 2000, and once somewhat after 2000. Can’t recall what the big crises was in the 1890s, but in 2001 or so the NASDAQ collapsed, losing about 75% of its value. It has only recently, in unadjusted dollars, surpassed its pre-crash highs.
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