Chelsea, Memes, and Pretentious: Chelsea Handler* @chelse...-9h Still nothing to do with you. Those are Obama's coat tails. Also, the people who elected you don't own stocks, you moron. Donald J. TrumparealDonald.. The U.S. has gained more than 5.2 trillion dollars in Stock Market Value since Election Day! Also, record business enthusiasm. わ752 1,830 8,382 T.J. Eckert @EckertT @chelseahandler So you think no Trump supporters have a 401k? No wonder they say Hollywood is pretentious and out of touch with Americans.
Selon les informations fournies par Fundata en date du 31 juillet 2018, le fonds Fidelity Special Situations (catégorie Canadian Focused Small/Mid Cap Equity) génère un rendement moyen annualisé net de 12,48% (net de frais de 2,26%) depuis 10 ans contre 2,06% de l’indice de référence. Donc, la valeur ajoutée du gestionnaire de ce fonds est 10% (12,48% moins 2,06%), ainsi les frais de gestion de 2,26% sont pleinement justifiés. Si un investisseur, basé sur les frais de gestion, écarte le fonds Fidelity Special Situations, il raterait cette belle occasion. De son côté, le FNB First Asset Active Utility & Infrastru ETF (FNB de la même catégorie, soit Canadian Focused Small/Mid Cap Equity) génère un rendement moyen annualisé net, depuis 10 ans, de 8,64% contre 2,06% de l’indice de référence. La valeur ajoutée, c’est 6%, presque 2 fois moins que celle du fonds Fidelity Special Situations. Les frais de gestion de ce FNB sont 0,65%. Donc, ce FNB ne serait pas une option intéressante même si les frais de gestion sont bas. En gros, il serait mieux de payer un peu pour avoir un bon rendement à long terme.
December 14, 2008 Denise Siegel1929 Stock Market Crash and now, 30s depression and now, 70s recession, answering readers, answering readers questions, criminal activity and the stock market, economic future, economic prediction, future stock market crash, global world crisis, Obama and the new economy, Pluto, precognition, stock market, Stock Market Crash, the dow1 Comment

By the way, our own Dr Doom, Professor Steve Keen, was also hailed as a good predictor of the GFC. Then at the University of Western Sydney, Keen received more than twice as many votes as his nearest rival and was judged the economist who first and most cogently warned the world of the coming Global Financial Collapse. He (and 2nd and 3rd place finishers, Nouriel Roubini (New York University) and Dean Baker (Centre for Economic and Policy Research), won the inaugural Revere Award for Economics, named in honour of Paul Revere and his famous ride through the night to warn Americans of the approaching British army.
J’aimerais apporter une petite nuance quand à l’utilité d’un conseiller financier. Il est effectivement facile de prendre la décision de gérer le tout soi-même car de façon générale, personne ne veut donner 2-3% de sa valeur de portefeuille (ce pourcentage diminue plus les sommes investis sont grosses). La question n’est pas de savoir si un conseiller financier est utile ou non mais bien d’obtenir un retour satisfaisant pour les sommes que nous investissons dans notre conseiller.
I have posted a Guest Blog Entry at the My Personal Finance Journey blog. It is called Investors Who Ignore Valuations Are Like Overeaters Who Ignore the Risk of Heart Disease. Juicy Excerpt: Raddr examines the numbers and concludes that: “The poor retiree’s real net worth has dropped nearly two-thirds (from $1,000 to $367) in only 11 years, and he is now withdrawing about 11 percent of his portfolio per year, which is a recipe for disaster even if the market heads up big-time from…
Set forth below is the text of a comment that I recently posted to the discussion thread for another blog entry at this site: Your analogy is flawed, not to mention stupid, not to mention horribly insulting to sexual assault victims. Cosby’s victims really did do all they could. You haven’t. You could create new accounts on every single board you were banned from TODAY. You could start writing your next book TODAY. You could start making a difference TODAY. No one is stopping you. You simply choose not to. As you should have realized by now, society doesn’t have much sympathy for someone who chooses to be a helpless victim. I’m not willing to create new accounts. If I did that, would I use my real name or not? If I used my real name, I would just be banned again. If I didn’t, I would essentially be lying. I would be appearing at a board that banned me under another name, knowing that I would be banned if I appeared under my true name. Huh? What the f? I have done nothing to justify a ban. Not once. I have nothing to be ashamed of. I have helped people. I have pointed out the errors in the Buy-and-Hold retirement studies. People need to know about those errors. A failed retirement is a serious life setback. I am happy to lend my efforts to any board that will have me and where I can help out. But I don’t approve of games-playing re these matters. I am Rob Bennett. I pointed out the error in the Buy-and-Hold retirement studies in a post that I put to the Motley Fool board on early retirement on the morning of May 13, 2002. The post generated a huge reaction, some insanely positive and some insanely negative. I am happy to answer any questions that anyone has, both those advanced by my supporters and those advanced by my critics. But I am not interested in pretending to be someone other than who I am. I am the fellow who put forward that famous post, I am proud of it, and I see no reason to make an effort to appear anywhere under another name. I hope that helps a small bit, my dear Goon friend. The True Rob Bennett (and No One Else) Related PostsBuy-and-Hold Goon to Rob: Just Because You Were Able […]
Markets started off looking firm this morning but by mid afternoon the Heng Seng Index broke below the key psychological 30,000 level as trade war concerns once again reared its ugly head. First came the Trump administration announcing a further $50b worth of tariffs on China imports followed by return fire from China threatening reciprocal tariffs on 106 U.S. product.
Over the next year, "equities will probably continue to go up as we have all these stock buybacks and free cash flow," Minerd told CNBC. But "ultimately, when the chickens come home to roost and we have a recession, we're going to see a lot of pressure on equities especially as defaults rise, and I think once we reach a peak that we'll probably see a 40% retracement in equities."
It’s my feeling that we are still in the midst of this crisis, and haven’t seen the worst of it, but it will turn around over the next couple of years. In terms of the bottoming out, if I were looking just at the aspects I’d have to say as an astrologer that the worst still will be the end of December into January when Pluto hits that 1 degree mark. And again when Pluto retrogrades back to that point at different points in 2009. However, as a psychic, I also know that charts are not always 100 accurate, so timing isn’t always exact because of this, and the intense urgency about the market I felt back in September has abated. I’m not sure if this is because we’re already in it, and I’ve gotten used to the energy, or if we really have seen the biggest drop we’re going to feel by comparison of where it was to begin with.
This new depression will be somewhere between the recession we felt of the 70s, and the 30s, but on a global scale. It won’t be barrels full of money to buy bread, but there will be tremendous unemployment and people having to change their lifestyles dramatically in some cases to get through this time. I also feel that the length and severity of this depression/recession has been greatly reduced by the election of Obama. His chart compared to that of the US constitution signing, and the Dow, and NASDAQ are good. Most of his energy regarding the markets will be spent in re-structuring them for the future good of the world’s economy. 
These stocks are known as high beta stocks, as they outperform on the way up and underperform on the way down. During a bull market, these high beta stocks are often the stocks that perform best. As a result they will grow into the largest positions in your portfolio. That’s why it’s a good idea to rebalance your portfolio and make sure the weighting of these “high beta” stocks aren’t too high. Here some more ways to prepare for a stock market crash:
Another way to find solid books about investing is to look for unbiased information. That's exactly what Johnson tells some of her wealth management clients to do when they are learning about investing in the marketplace. When asked about one of her recommendations for a book about personal finance and investing, she immediately mentioned a book written by a financial journalist because of the author's ability to just state the facts.
Lately, things have worked out better for me than they have in the past, but, if the market crashes, I will take a hit along with almost everyone else. I still own stocks because that is where the best returns are, but I try to stay diversified in stocks of companies that are very likely to survive a serious recession. If I sold my stocks, where would I put the money? Returns on bank savings and short term bonds are less than inflation. Long term bonds look just as risky as stocks to me, maybe riskier.
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