2) Au niveau fiscal, et ceci est très important, si vous transigez quotidiennement ou plusieurs fois par semaine et que le revenu annuel est important, Revenu Canada et Revenu Québec ne traiteront pas ces revenus comme des gains en capitaux mais bien comme un revenu pur et simple de travail puisqu’ils considèrent que vous exercez une activité de professionnel (et le « seuil » du nombre de transactions à partir duquel ils vous collent l’étiquette de « professionnel de l’investissement » est entièrement à leur discrétion !). Vous ne serez donc pas imposé à 25% (ou sur 50% des gains) mais bien sur tous les gains donc à votre taux marginal. Et le Fisc se fait un malin plaisir de revenir loin en arrière pour réclamer son dû (avec intérêts s’il y a lieu). Ceci est vrai pour les comptes de courtage ordinaires ou les CELI. Soyez donc très prudent dans vos déclarations de revenus si vous ne voulez pas avoir de mauvaises surprises quelques années plus tard. Évidemment, sachant ceci, si l’activité vous procure un revenu important, le taux d’imposition sera alors secondaire…
The environment is top of my list because I feel 2018 will see unprecedented earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and ferocious weather. (Correct 10:10 Sadly, Jan 2018 we have seen the start of this) I have been saying for some years that we can expect this – not just because of global warming but also because of increased activity of the Sun. We have seen terrible hurricanes but I feel there is worse to come.

Experienced investors who are “sophisticated enough to focus on these numbers and act on them themselves” can benefit by making their own adjustments, Mr. Davis said. Tried-and true investments like balanced funds and target date funds (which become more conservative as a given date nears) can make basic adjustments for you. Advisers can do this as well.
I've posted a Guest Blog Entry at the www.MyRetirementBlog.com site. It's entitled What If Everything You Thought You Knew About Retirement Planning Turned Out To Be Wrong? Juicy Excerpt: I never went to investing school. I never managed a big fund. It shouldn’t be possible for me to be the first person to develop a retirement calculator that gets the numbers right. I mean, come on! But the numbers generated by my retirement calculator are very different from the numbers generated by all…
HARRY DENT JR.: We may be starting a topping process. I’m seeing signs of that, but it hasn’t yet been proven. We ought to see the market start to go down by early next year. If it doesn’t, I’m going back to the drawing board. If the market doesn’t start crashing by late January or early February, then we aren’t topping here. But we’re saying there’s going to be a crash. It’s just a matter of when [exactly].
I recently engaged in a discussion of the Efficient Market Theory at the Early Retirement Extreme Forum. The thread is titled Is Efficient Market a Theory, Hypothesis, Fact, Law or Notion? Juicy Excerpt #1: I want to be fair in my descriptions. I don't want to underplay the extent to which I believe the evidence has been misinterpreted. I believe that this misinterpretation has caused a great deal of misery. So I want to be firm on this point. But I also want to be fair. I don't want to be…
Tesco has expanded its operations outside the UK to 11 other countries in the world. The company pulled out of the USA in 2013, but as of 2018 continues to see growth elsewhere. Tesco's international expansion strategy has responded to the need to be sensitive to local expectations in other countries by entering into joint ventures with local partners, such Charoen Pokphand in Thailand to form Tesco Lotus, and by appointing a very high proportion of local personnel to management positions. It also makes small acquisitions as part of its strategy: for example, in its 2005/2006 financial year it made acquisitions in South Korea, one in Dubai, UAE; one in Poland and one in Japan.[96] On 7 September 2015, Tesco sold its South Korean business, Homeplus, to MBK Partners and partnered with a Canadian pension fund and Temasek Holdings for the deal.[97]
Set forth below is the text of a comment that I recently posted to the discussion thread for another blog entry at this site: The comment was present tense. You immediately shifted to past tense. The question was why are you doing nothing NOW? Your answer: “I have never done one smidgen less than all that I can do.” So right now, nothing is absolutely all you can do. You’re as helpless as a newborn babe in the snow. You may not have noticed, but newborn babes in the snow generally aren’t rich and famous. And they have the excuse of being newborn. What’s your excuse for your helplessness? We live in communities. The community in which I live has not offered the amount of help that I need to bring down Buy-and-Hold and replace it with Valuation-Informed Indexing. That’s my explanation for why I am not rich and famous today, for why I am instead a newborn babe in the snow. Say that you were one of the women who was attacked by Bill Cosby. And say that you tried to do something about it when it happened. And that no one cared. He just kept committing his crimes because no one cared enough to take effective action. The world would be telling you that you were helpless, right? That’s the message that the world has been sending me for 16 years. Now — If the world sends you a message that you are helpless, should you give up on your efforts to do good? In some circumstances, you should. If a woman who was attacked by Bill Cosby in 1965 made efforts to seek justice and received no help, I certainly wouldn’t have blamed her if she stopped making those efforts. And I wouldn’t blame someone who has made efforts to tell the world how stock investing really works if they ran into the sort of resistance that I have run into. We are all given only so many years of life and we have to make judgments as to how to employ those years of life energy. There’s a case for me saying after 16 years:”Oh, I gave this a good shot and it hasn’t yet paid off, I think I will direct my energies elsewhere.” But there is also a good case — I think a much better case — for me soldiering on. Bill Cosby […]

And concerning the planet Pluto: in Nov. 2005 there was a very significant astronomy event: it was announced that two more moons of Pluto have been discovered, the previous moon Charon having been discovered in 1978, and is 12024 miles from Pluto, and 752 miles wide, and orbits Pluto in 6.4 days. Pluto being one of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, Death, as explained on this page, this is very significant. This is another sign that Death will be riding soon. One of the newly discovered moons is 30-80 miles wide, and 30,000 miles from Pluto, and orbits Pluto every 25.5 days. The other new moon is 35-100 miles wide, and 40,000 miles from Pluto, and orbits Pluto every 38 days. Note that on July 14 2015 the NASA New Horizons spacecraft reached Pluto, so will the Fourth Horseman Death ride in 2018 - 2020?
Shadox at the Money and Such blog recently posted a blog entry entitled Passive Investing Is for Extremists: The Critque. Juicy Excerpt: His main claim relates no so much to how you invest in stocks, but rather to the percentage of your portfolio that is invested in this asset class, regardless of which stocks or stock funds you put your money into. I think that it is more correct to say that Rob is against passive asset allocation, than he is against passive investing as I understand…
According to one interpretation of the efficient-market hypothesis (EMH), only changes in fundamental factors, such as the outlook for margins, profits or dividends, ought to affect share prices beyond the short term, where random 'noise' in the system may prevail. The 'hard' efficient-market hypothesis does not explain the cause of events such as the crash in 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average plummeted 22.6 percent—the largest-ever one-day fall in the United States.[56]
Currently, the U.S. stock market is in the midst of one of the longest bull markets in its history. Since bottoming out in March 2009, the broad-based S&P 500 (INDEX: ^GSPC), led by a strong rally in technology stocks and other growth industries, has surged by more than 325%! Mind you, the stock market has historically returned 7% a year, inclusive of dividend reinvestment and adjusted for inflation. So, to say that things are going well right now would be an understatement.
The NASDAQ has surged by a similar percentage. In other words, the winds that brought Trump to the White House fueled some $5.0 trillion into Wall Street’s market capitalization. How much more energy can this already remarkable—and improbable—rally have? Chances are the rally will taper off. It could do this gradually or with a bang—that is, a crash.
J’ai ouvert un compte géré avec Questrade, mais je suis en processus de transférer les fonds dans un compte auto-géré et d’appliquer un modèle de ETF/FNB indexés proposé sur Couchpoatato. J’avais cédulé des dépôts automatiques que je comptais garder pour le compte autogéré. Par contre je lis à plusieurs endroits que si on a moins de 50 000$ de fonds et qu’on dépose de petits montants régulièrement, les ETF ne sont pas une bonne stratégie à cause des commissions, que le TD E-series ou compte d’investissement Tangerine seraient de meilleures options. Sauf que, tel que tu le mentionnais dans cet article, à Questrade, les transactions pour des FNB canadiens (en fait, Nord Américain selon leur FAQ) ne prennent pas de commissions.
His new book, “Zero Hour: Turn the Greatest Political and Financial Upheaval in Modern History to Your Advantage,” written with Andrew Pancholi (Portfolio), raises a loud alarm about the 2020s, which, based mainly on four demographic and geopolitical cycles, will bring a ghastly global crisis, or what Dent terms the dark “Economic Winter,” he predicts.

Pour répondre à ta question sur les conseillers humains chez Wealthsimple, j’ai reçu plusieurs courriel une fois que je me suis inscrit sur le site pour me dire que je pouvais à tout moment parler à un conseiller au téléphone ou bien envoyer un courriel (il y avait probablement aussi l’option de « chatter » en direct avec un conseiller mais je ne suis plus sûr à 100%) si jamais on voulait de l’aide ou des conseils pour ouvrir un compte (REER, CELI, REEE, compte personnel, compte conjoint, etc.) . Bref, il y avait du soutien si on voulait.


So this is the rectified chart I did. In this one you can see Uranus hitting the Saturn in the 9th and Pluto is at 19 degrees. In this one Mars is right on the cusp of the 5th. The 5th rules gambling and we can see Venus/South Node/Sun/Mercury transiting the 7th making a roll over natal Pluto in Aquarius (7th house/legal issues) and most of those planets making an opposition to the natal Uranus in the 1st house. Neptune is also in the 8th starting to oppose the natal Mars and starting an inconjunction to natal Uranus in the 1st – lots of volatility. Transiting Saturn is also in the 5th making a trine to Venus causing constriction in gambling but it seems to suggest that once it moves past the 5th it could settle down. Now I’m going to go back to the alternate chart and see if it makes a big difference for this same period.
Venus will enter Leo sign on 4th and will be under the aspect of Mars. There will be rise in the rates of Gold & Silver. The demand in the grains & commodities like peanuts & sesame will be noticed. Sun will enter Cancer sign on 16th, Monday and thereby conjoin Mercury & Rahu. These three planets will be under the aspect of Mars. The rates of dairy & beverages stocks (Hatsun, Kwality, Parag & Manpasand etc) will go down. Petro stocks may also see decline in the demand (BPCL, Chennai Petro & IOC etc). Rains will be normal. Bullions will see selling trend. Stocks indices will also see depressing sentiments.
En bourse, personne de peut vous assurer un rendement. Vous êtes à la merci des marchés. Vous pouvez consulter l’historique du portefeuille et espérer que la tendance se maintienne. Mais, gardez en tête que vous pouvez perdre (surtout à court terme). L’important est de garder une vision à long terme. Par exemple, les portefeuilles GPS ont un horizon de placement de cinq ans.
In 2014, Henry Blodget wrote that stocks were 40% overvalued and that he couldn’t find any data to suggest that the market would continue rising. Although he didn’t state that a crash was coming, he did tell us that stocks were likely to give “lousy returns” over the next ten years. He also concluded his article with some technical analysis from John Hussman, which cautioned that the S&P 500 could collapse after it reached 1,900.
There is ongoing debate among economists and historians as to what role the crash played in subsequent economic, social, and political events. The Economist argued in a 1998 article that the Depression did not start with the stock market crash,[40] nor was it clear at the time of the crash that a depression was starting. They asked, "Can a very serious Stock Exchange collapse produce a serious setback to industry when industrial production is for the most part in a healthy and balanced condition?" They argued that there must be some setback, but there was not yet sufficient evidence to prove that it would be long or would necessarily produce a general industrial depression.[41]

Academic Researcher Silenced By Threats to Get Him Fired From His Job After Showing Dangers of Buy-and-Hold Investing Strategies — Teaser VersionThis is a briefer version of the same article, the article that I believe is the most important one that I have written in my 30-year journalism career. I believe that the story told at this web site is the most important economic and political story of any of our lifetimes and this article sums up the key points in one little package of dynamite. If Buy-and-Hold were a legitimate strategy, every Buy-and-Holder would be ashamed to learn that even one academic researcher was threatened. We cannot move forward so long as the intimidation tactics of the Buy-and-Holders dominate all discussions of what works in stock investing. I use this short version of the article in my e-mail campaigns aimed at getting researcher and stock advisors and bloggers and journalists and policymakers involved in our effort to open the internet up to honest posting on ALL investing topics. Please help get others involved if you can. We are all in this together!
There are some positive aspects coming up in the next couple of years that will ease the market and after the rebirth could enable the market to be better than before. But these are trines and trines are not fated in the same way squares and conjunctions are, so it’s imperative that everyone get involved politically and demand reform. And as I’ve stated before McCain’s chart would activate the worst possible aspects to the Dow and plummet us into a DEPRESSION here in the US and most likely the world as all markets are connected in our current world.
The crash in 1987 raised some puzzles – main news and events did not predict the catastrophe and visible reasons for the collapse were not identified. This event raised questions about many important assumptions of modern economics, namely, the theory of rational human conduct, the theory of market equilibrium and the efficient-market hypothesis. For some time after the crash, trading in stock exchanges worldwide was halted, since the exchange computers did not perform well owing to enormous quantity of trades being received at one time. This halt in trading allowed the Federal Reserve System and central banks of other countries to take measures to control the spreading of worldwide financial crisis. In the United States the SEC introduced several new measures of control into the stock market in an attempt to prevent a re-occurrence of the events of Black Monday.

The stock market boomed because, since the Great Financial Crisis of 2008, the Federal Reserve Bank (“Fed”) has kept interest rates close to 0%  (the infamous ZIRP or Zero Interest Rate Policy). So, from December 2008 to December 2015 – for 7 years – corporations were borrowing trillions of dollars and buying back their own shares! Hence the stock market boom.


Tesco has expanded its operations outside the UK to 11 other countries in the world. The company pulled out of the USA in 2013, but as of 2018 continues to see growth elsewhere. Tesco's international expansion strategy has responded to the need to be sensitive to local expectations in other countries by entering into joint ventures with local partners, such Charoen Pokphand in Thailand to form Tesco Lotus, and by appointing a very high proportion of local personnel to management positions. It also makes small acquisitions as part of its strategy: for example, in its 2005/2006 financial year it made acquisitions in South Korea, one in Dubai, UAE; one in Poland and one in Japan.[96] On 7 September 2015, Tesco sold its South Korean business, Homeplus, to MBK Partners and partnered with a Canadian pension fund and Temasek Holdings for the deal.[97]
Psychics and clairvoyants are trying to attempt too many things at a time. That is not possible. World is all confusion, chaos, pestilence, trouble all around. Power crazy politicians, money greedy business people, bloody minded masses world wide, rut mills universities. Many factors force thousands real genuine psychics clairvoyants to stay unknown. World is heading fast toward its total annihilation. Can scientists see it ?
Several universities have moved to put some of their curriculum online for free. MIT’s OpenCourseWare program has lecture notes available from an investment course originally taught in 2003, but the bones are still sound. Open Yale has courses available on economic and financial topics. Stanford’s self-study courses list can be searched by topic. Note that you won’t receive college credit for taking these courses online.

On September 16, 2008, failures of massive financial institutions in the United States, due primarily to exposure to packaged subprime loans and credit default swaps issued to insure these loans and their issuers, rapidly devolved into a global crisis. This resulted in a number of bank failures in Europe and sharp reductions in the value of stocks and commodities worldwide. The failure of banks in Iceland resulted in a devaluation of the Icelandic króna and threatened the government with bankruptcy. Iceland obtained an emergency loan from the International Monetary Fund in November.[31] In the United States, 15 banks failed in 2008, while several others were rescued through government intervention or acquisitions by other banks.[32] On October 11, 2008, the head of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) warned that the world financial system was teetering on the "brink of systemic meltdown".[33]


With the bankers' financial resources behind him, Whitney placed a bid to purchase a large block of shares in U.S. Steel at a price well above the current market. As traders watched, Whitney then placed similar bids on other "blue chip" stocks. This tactic was similar to one that had ended the Panic of 1907. It succeeded in halting the slide. The Dow Jones Industrial Average recovered, closing with it down only 6.38 points for the day. The rally continued on Friday, October 25, and the half day session on Saturday the 26th but, unlike 1907, the respite was only temporary.
Set forth below is the text of a comment that I recently posted to the discussion thread for another blog entry at this site: “Yours comes with death threats and demands for unjustified board bannings and thousands of acts of defamation and threats to get academic researchers fired from their jobs.” Death threats? You mean this link you sent to the police that is obviously not a death threat? https://boards.fool.com/sydsydsyd-theyre-taking-them-down-as-fast-as-we-18207722.aspx?sort=postdate I did indeed show that to the police. And, yes, that is indeed a death threat. Posts like that do not belong in discussions of how stock investing works. And it is ALWAYS the Buy-and-Holders who advance such posts. It is only a small number of Buy-and-Holders who do that sort of thing. But it is a LARGE percentage of the population of Buy-and-Holders who TOLERATE that sort of thing. Motley Fool should have banned the person who advanced that post. The post is clearly in violation of their published rules. They didn’t ban the person who advanced the post because the majority of the population of the board was Buy-and-Holders and Motley Fool wanted the money that came in as a result of having those people at the site. This is why Buy-and-Hold is so dangerous. It is an emotion-based strategy. It cannot survive in a world in which posting based on the last 37 years of peer-reviewed research is permitted. So it is not just that the Buy-and-Holders get it wrong. Getting it wrong is a small thing in relative terms. It is that the Buy-and-Holders cannot tolerate anyone else getting it right. Buy-and-Holders attack those who advocate research-based strategies because, when people come to see the merits of research-based strategies, it makes the Buy-and-Holders look bad for promoting the OPPOSITE of what works. What works is to always practice price discipline when buying stocks. Buy-and-Holders tell investors NOT to exercise price discipline (long-term timing). Huh? What the f? I OPPOSE that sort of post, Anonymous. Please feel free to spread the word all across the internet. I would feel that you were doing me a favor by doing so. That sort of thing is not my particular cup of tea. It’s not a close call. The primary reason why I chose to build the Retire Early at Motley Fool is that they had the strongest rules on the internet protecting people from that sort of posting behavior. […]

“When I first met Henry, I thought, ‘What the hell,’ ” Husband says, evenly. Over time he learned to trust Weingarten’s advice and stop asking questions. “So if he uses—Henry, forgive me, because I don’t follow it—if he uses Jupiter and Mars to say that the next three-month trend for gold is going to be good, and if it coincides with something that I’m thinking, then OK.” To Husband, Weingarten’s appeal is obvious: “He uses astrology to separate himself from the other guys.”
Most of the professional investors are signaling signs of a market collapse in next two three years before 2020 starts. Market crash in 2000 was sparked by technology sector failure and 2008 crash was sparked by real estate and property. But today almost all sectors have been overvalued. Many sectors listed at S&P 500 are trading at the highest level seen in last ten years.
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