Slingshot, you have me laughing, thats a good one. Hopefully i am not responsible for run on the ammo. Me like everyone else, has heard it from the horses mouth. No one knows the exact date when it will hit in September. I was told by my scientist that by Novermber, people will literally be on the streets in mass, raising hell on earth, and he is not sure why, its just what he was told. Food and water shortage, civil war, revolution, uprising? etc. Who knows. All that crap i am tryping up, its what i am being told is likely to commense.

As such, conventional logic in economics is that you can expect a stock market crash and/or recession every seven to ten years, give or take (economics is as much of an art as it is a science). The actual timing of the crash, beyond those general guidelines, is next to impossible. If it was even remotely conceivable, I would be on the Forbes 400 list by now!


There are some positive aspects coming up in the next couple of years that will ease the market and after the rebirth could enable the market to be better than before. But these are trines and trines are not fated in the same way squares and conjunctions are, so it’s imperative that everyone get involved politically and demand reform. And as I’ve stated before McCain’s chart would activate the worst possible aspects to the Dow and plummet us into a DEPRESSION here in the US and most likely the world as all markets are connected in our current world.
I recently posted a Guest Blog Entry at the Future Storm blog. It's entitled What the Stock Investing Experts Don't Want You to Know. Juicy Excerpt: The experts are experts in selling first, second, third and fourth. They don’t tell us what we need to know about stocks but only what we want to know about stocks. We all wanted to think that those insane prices could continue indefinitely. That was of course a hopeless dream. But the experts did not want to be the ones to let us know. They…
The recession projection is based largely on interest rate expectations using two criteria, according to Freddy Martino, a Vanguard spokesman. One is what economists refer to as a flattening yield curve, with the Federal Reserve expected to raise shorter-term rates faster than longer-term ones. The other is rising credit risk for below-investment-grade bonds.

It's the "experts" who got us into our current economic mess. It's does not make too much sense to think that it's going to be the "experts" who are going to get us out. We need new ideas. New ideas come from new places. That's why my first choice of a partner for my initiative on getting the word out to middle-class investors about what we have learned about the realities of stock investing over the past seven years was the author of the Frugal Dad blog. Frugal Dad is a smart fellow, a…
Tesco's financial crisis of 2014[163] led to their reducing their capital expenditure on new shops, which led to the boarding up of new unopened shops in Chatteris, Cambridgeshire[164] and Immingham, Lincolnshire.[165] The controversial Chatteris mothballing caused local criticism after the £22 million project had re-routed a river and built a controversial roundabout and underpass, whereas the much anticipated Immingham development demolished a local shopping centre and closed several local shops to enable its construction. The impending arrival of Tesco also contributed to the Co-operative's decision to close their shop in the town.[166] Tesco's announcing the indefinite delay in their shop opening left the town of around 15,000 inhabitants without a supermarket. Tesco went ahead with the opening of shops in Little Lever,[167] Dunfermline[168] and Rotherham.[169]

Super article de vulgarisation. J’ai commencé à prendre mes finances personnelles en main également et la courbe d’apprentissage est vraiment impressionnante quand on s’y met un peu. Pour moi c’est terminé les fonds communs par le biais d’institution financière (et pourtant je travaille pour l’une d’entre elle…), je ne crois toutefois pas retirer immédiatement les sommes investies mais plutôt gérer de plus en plus activement le reste de mon épargne. Je continuerai de vous suivre ! Au plaisir d’échanger avec vous.
To a financial astrologer, this is unsurprising. Recently I connected with an enigmatic finance guy who for decades applied his astrological models in relative secret as a trader on the floor of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. He was drawn to astrology via Buddhism, on which he overlaid, among other things, economist Joseph Schumpeter’s theory of cyclical creative destruction. The trader, who asked that his name not be used for fear of being shamed, cites Einstein to point out the universe is just a pattern of energy, and thus obviously shaped by the movements of large heavenly masses. How could markets not be affected by the sun, moon, and planets?

In the chart of a whole stock exchange or nation, Scorpio is about global debts and trade deals and global tax avoidance systems between countries. It’s really about ’til debt do us part’ for small and big nations. This goes all the way back to the post-war bills in Europe, and their impact on Germany in the 1930s, the last time Uranus was in Taurus. So we’re also talking Europe in 2018 and 2019 and the Euro. Most astrological charts here are based on data from The Book of World Horoscopes by Nicholas Campion (The Wessex Astrologer) and are below, end of page, for those of you who want to see the astrology for yourself.
Or it may not be. Think about it. Doomsayers have pointed to any number of reasons in recent years why they believed the market was headed for a downturn: Standard & Poor's downgrading of U.S. Treasury debt in 2011; the growth-slowdown scare in China that sent stock prices down 12% in the summer of 2015; Brexit and the election of Donald Trump, both of which were supposed to be catalysts for a market rout. But none of these warnings panned out.
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As many other crashes, the Black Monday crash followed a major bull market in which the Dow rose by about 250% in a five-year period from 1982 through 1987. Also like many other crashes, it was preceded by a few smaller declines before major panic set in. Two of the three trading days preceding Black Monday were pretty dismal, with drops of 3.8% and 4.6%.
However, if China’s economy falters it might. Geopolitical turmoil concerning North Korea, Iran, Syria or Russia could also become a catalyst if things escalate enough. It’s most likely that the next market crash, whenever it occurs, will be the result of a perfect storm caused by several factors. But, since it’s not something anyone can predict, it’s best to concentrate on being prepared for a crash whenever it may occur.
Fake, LinkedIn, and Memes: theverge.com HE VERGE How a group of Redditors is creating a fake stock market to figure out the value of memes Memes rule everything around me By Lizzie Plaugic on January 10, 2017 10:38 am TWEET f SHARE in LINKEDIN

*flashbacks to Black Tuesday* via /r/MemeEconomy http://ift.tt/2j1kRWH


I've put a guest post to the Balance Junkie blog titled Stock Investing Is a Political Act. Juicy Excerpt: We all have political views. And we all have investing views. Most of us don’t think of the two types of views as intersecting. Politics is the process by which we decide where we want to go as a society. Investing is personal. It’s the process by which each of us as individuals accumulates the money he or she needs to finance his or her retirement. How I invest is my concern alone,…
Having been suspended for three successive trading days (October 9, 10, and 13), the Icelandic stock market reopened on 14 October, with the main index, the OMX Iceland 15, closing at 678.4, which was about 77% lower than the 3,004.6 at the close on October 8. This reflected that the value of the three big banks, which had formed 73.2% of the value of the OMX Iceland 15, had been set to zero.
The crash in 1987 raised some puzzles – main news and events did not predict the catastrophe and visible reasons for the collapse were not identified. This event raised questions about many important assumptions of modern economics, namely, the theory of rational human conduct, the theory of market equilibrium and the efficient-market hypothesis. For some time after the crash, trading in stock exchanges worldwide was halted, since the exchange computers did not perform well owing to enormous quantity of trades being received at one time. This halt in trading allowed the Federal Reserve System and central banks of other countries to take measures to control the spreading of worldwide financial crisis. In the United States the SEC introduced several new measures of control into the stock market in an attempt to prevent a re-occurrence of the events of Black Monday.
Miranda Marquit recently posted a Guest Blog Entry at the Investor Junkie blog called How to Invest Using Valuation-Informed Indexing: Interview with Rob Bennett. Juicy Excerpt: Rob Bennett has been advocating valuation informed indexing for years, and his insistence on it has even had him kicked off investing forums, including the Bogleheads forum. “Buy and hold is intellectually dead,” he says. “It’s not practically dead, since plenty of investors still use the theory, but…
Hi Craig, with only two days left now until the Brexit referendum, the statisticians are now that the chances of leaving Europe are now only 1/5. Polls and opinion are saying it’s 80% likely there will be a vote to remain (this may be directly linked to recent news events/incidents at the weekend, along with media scaremongering). Worth noting, that last week it was an even 50/50 chance for Brexit. So, do you still believe a Brexit will occur in two days time on the 23rd June 2016? And if it doesn’t would it be in the nations best interest to Br-remain?

Another super post and discussion thread at the Balance Junkie blog. This one is called History Only Rhymes. Juicy Excerpt: Now I know that neither the Potato investors nor the Valuation Informed Index investors would claim that history will repeat itself exactly. They’re just using it to determine investment probabilities. That’s how I use historical data too. But I also like to incorporate a few other variables, which others may or may not find useful, but have served me well so…
People warned about subprime mortgage loans, derivatives, and too much leverage, but nobody, to my knowledge, said a bursting housing bubble would cause a global crisis that would lead to the demise of venerable financial firms, require trillion-dollar taxpayer bailouts, and cause a recession that rivalled only the Great Depression in its magnitude.
Sixth, Europe, too, will experience slower growth, owing to monetary-policy tightening and trade frictions. Moreover, populist policies in countries such as Italy may lead to an unsustainable debt dynamic within the eurozone. The still-unresolved “doom loop” between governments and banks holding public debt will amplify the existential problems of an incomplete monetary union with inadequate risk-sharing. Under these conditions, another global downturn could prompt Italy and other countries to exit the eurozone altogether.
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