Even odder than the existence of the Astrologers Fund is its ability to attract the interest of nonlunatics. A few years ago, Fox News’ Neil Cavuto told Weingarten on the air that he was “one of the best stockpickers I know.” Post-symposium, at the Princeton Club, Weingarten and I are joined at a table by a buttoned-down crew. One of them is an analyst for a small investment bank; another says he runs his own family office. Everyone has some kind of relationship with Weingarten, from the cordial to the professional, though nobody seems to understand how financial astrology works. “Tell me the time, don’t build me a clock!” says Paul Feeney, a corporate headhunter, repeatedly.
Unfortunately, the Fed is fallible, just like stock market investors. If inflation -- i.e., the rising price of goods and services -- begins to heat up, the nation’s central bank could choose to get considerably more hawkish with its monetary policy. Or, in plainer English, it could get more aggressive with hiking its benchmark short-term interest rate between banks. Should that happen, interest rates for variable rate loans and mortgages would be expected to rise. This, in turn, could put the brakes on economic growth, as well as increase delinquency rates tied to variable rate loans.
The panic began again on Black Monday (October 28), with the market closing down 12.8 percent. On Black Tuesday (October 29) more than 16 million shares were traded. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost another 12 percent and closed at 198—a drop of 183 points in less than two months. Prime securities tumbled like the issues of bogus gold mines. General Electric fell from 396 on September 3 to 210 on October 29. American Telephone and Telegraph dropped 100 points. DuPont fell from a summer high of 217 to 80, United States Steel from 261 to 166, Delaware and Hudson from 224 to 141, and Radio Corporation of America (RCA) common stock from 505 to 26. Political and financial leaders at first affected to treat the matter as a mere spasm in the market, vying with one another in reassuring statements. President Hoover and Treasury Secretary Andrew W. Mellon led the way with optimistic predictions that business was “fundamentally sound” and that a great revival of prosperity was “just around the corner.” Although the Dow Jones Industrial Average nearly reached the 300 mark again in 1930, it sank rapidly in May 1930. Another 20 years would pass before the Dow average regained enough momentum to surpass the 200-point level.

I've posted a Guest Blog Entry at the www.MyRetirementBlog.com site. It's entitled What If Everything You Thought You Knew About Retirement Planning Turned Out To Be Wrong? Juicy Excerpt: I never went to investing school. I never managed a big fund. It shouldn’t be possible for me to be the first person to develop a retirement calculator that gets the numbers right. I mean, come on! But the numbers generated by my retirement calculator are very different from the numbers generated by all…
Le REER te permet de placer de l’argent sur lequel tu n’as pas payer d’impôt et de diminuer le montant sur lequel tu paies de l’impôt chaque année (il diminue en quelque sorte ton salaire brut). Le but étant, une fois la retraite atteinte, de retirer un montant annuel de tes REER plus faible que ce que tu gagnes comme revenu actuellement, et donc de payer moins d’impôt en bout de ligne. Ainsi, je vais donner des chiffres fictifs mais si tu gagnes 100,000$ actuellement et que tu devrais payer près de 45% d’impôt, mais que tu places anuellement 30000$ dans ton REER, tu vas payer moins d’impôt ajourd’hui, et si une fois la retaitre atteinte tu ne retires que 40,000$ par année de ton REER, tu ne vas payer de l’impôt que sur 40,000$. Donc, le REER te permet surtout de sauver au niveau de l’impôt maintenant et plus tard. Le REER est avantageux surtout s’il te permet de changer de classe de revenu imposable, ou si tu comptes retirer beaucoup moins d’argent annuellement à la retraite que ce que tu gagnes actuellement.
Most of the professional investors are signaling signs of a market collapse in next two three years before 2020 starts. Market crash in 2000 was sparked by technology sector failure and 2008 crash was sparked by real estate and property. But today almost all sectors have been overvalued. Many sectors listed at S&P 500 are trading at the highest level seen in last ten years.
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